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Friday, March 28, 2008

Chop Suey, Neumo’s Get Told to Turn it Down

posted by on March 28 at 15:16 PM

Around 10:30 pm last night, the cops showed up to Chop Suey and told Club Pop, a bi-weekly 18+ electronic and rock music dance night, that they were being too loud. They turned it down a bit, but it creeped back up, and at around 12:30, 15 minutes into the set of their headliner Tim Sweeney, the cops showed up again and demanded that they turn it down. When they complied, many patrons left.

“The thing about this kind of [electronic] music, is that when people go out to hear it, they are paying for a great soundsystem. Otherwise, they could just listen to it in their bedroom,” says Club Pop promoter Michael Yuasa. The end of night exodus didn’t surprise him. “If you can’t feel the bass in your chest, no one wants to dance.”

Club Pop has never had a noise complaint before, but Neumo’s says they’ve been visited many times lately by the police, the liquor board, the city attorney’s office, and the fire department. “We’ve had someone in here almost every night for the last six weeks,” says co-owner Steven Severin. Calls to the police department and the liquor board haven’t been returned yet. “They’ve told us that Neumo’s is too loud, but we are asking, what is too loud?” Neumo’s is in a relative dead zone—there are no residential units near the club. “Without an actual decibel meter reading, we’re not going to turn it down.”

Severin believes the current rule is that the noise has to read at 57 decibels from 75 feet away for a violation. Newell Aldrich, an aide to Nick Licata, says that the current rules on the books permit officers to use the public disturbance municipal code to ask clubs to turn it down—there are no current decibel standards. When the officers showed up to Chop Suey last night, they weren’t carrying a decibel meter. “Our sound person took a measurement with our decibel reader and asked to compare it to the officer’s. The officer said that she left her meter in her locker that night,” says Yuasa.

On June 1, the new nightlife ordinance will go into effect. Council executives are determining precise decibel standards right now for the new rule, which will make it “unlawful for a person to have allowed to originate noise from the property that is audible from inside the residence of a person of normal hearing.”

RSS icon Comments

1

thats cuz its for teh hIpSteRZz

Posted by lar | March 28, 2008 3:25 PM
2

Same damn thing happened at that A Place to Bury Strangers show. Lame.

Posted by Eric Grandy | March 28, 2008 3:26 PM
3

pigs were out measuring the Comets (lack of) soundproofing 2 fridays ago. Old news, but it will mean the end of shows there if fatty mcnickels plan goes into action

Posted by bobcat | March 28, 2008 3:28 PM
4

So wait, was this at Neumo's or Chop Suey?

Posted by NaFun | March 28, 2008 3:30 PM
5

and the cops were bitching that there weren't enough cops in town to get the job done. 2 of the 7 cops that were working that shift focus on this?

Posted by cochise. | March 28, 2008 3:30 PM
6

annoying.

Posted by ashley | March 28, 2008 3:35 PM
7

easy targets, they sure as hell aren't gonna risk getting shot hanging out at 23rd and Union... try calling in a noise disturbance there and see if any police show up.

Posted by CD | March 28, 2008 3:36 PM
8

meanwhile a little downwind from the chop, in the same few weeks rplace has seen a few visits from the liqour board with cops in tow. their problem was with the porn.. man porn to be specific. they also said that they're responding to 'complaints'.

Posted by reverend dr dj riz | March 28, 2008 3:39 PM
9

Dear Chop Suey:

TURN DOWN THAT ROCK AND ROLL MUSIC.

Greg Nickels

P.S. GET OFF MY LAWN.

Posted by Gomez | March 28, 2008 3:54 PM
10

wait who in The Cops did this? I'm confused.

Posted by lar | March 28, 2008 4:08 PM
11

Pike/Pine is dead. Just face it. Anything cool on that strip will soon be destroyed.

Posted by Trouble | March 28, 2008 4:23 PM
12

sounds like someone didn't get invited to the party

Posted by tribble | March 28, 2008 4:45 PM
13

High-density living is the most environmentally and socially responsible way to live, but the only way for high-density communities to realistically exist is through soundproofing.

From apartment to apartment, from business to business, from commercial to residential-- everyone has to be able to exist and to hear themselves THINK.

Just because their neighbor is a nightclub/bar/concert venue, that doesn't mean that the other business or city dweller should have to sacrifice their right to quiet.

I'm all for clubs and bars and shows and nightlife, but to try to villainize the city and the mayor for the noise ordinance is just dumb.

The city isn't telling the clubs to shut down or to close, they're just saying that if you want to exist, you have to do so responsibly and as a good neighbor. A huge part of that is through soundproofing.

Do you have any idea how LOUD 57 decibels is? And at 75 feet away?! That should absolutely, positively be against the law. How rude and presumptuous of a club owner to assume that everyone wants to be subjected to their music, their noise. And what kind of dickhead makes a statement like “Without an actual decibel meter reading, we’re not going to turn it down?!” Obviously it's too loud, or the police wouldn't be wasting their time. If they had responded to the complaint and didn't think there was anything out of compliance, they would have left.

Instead of saying, "Gee, how could we be better neighbors? How could we comply with the law? How could we all work together?" He decides that it's better to give the city, his neighbors, and the community a great big "FUCK YOU."

That kind of attitude makes me hope that they fine the fuckwit. Big time.

Anyone who makes the argument that it's too expensive to soundproof is totally full of shit. When you open a business, you have to take into account the cost of opening it-- for a bar or a nightclub, part of the cost is going to be soundproofing. If you can't afford it, don't open the business.

Plus, everyone knows that once the booze starts flowing, you're rolling in the dough. I wouldn't open up a gas station if I couldn't afford the pumps. Don't open up a nightclub if you can't afford the soundproofing.

Go Team Nickels! Go Nightlife Ordinance! Go June First! Go High-Density Urban Dwelling!

Posted by High Density | March 28, 2008 5:17 PM
14

do you guys wanna talk about folk music..yet..?

Posted by PWRFL KAZ | March 28, 2008 5:19 PM
15

Oh, and @3, those "pigs" that were taking measurements? They were probably there taking measurements because that was their assignment. Does that make them "pigs?" Doing their job, the job that they get paid to do?

The city probably has them taking readings so they can tell existing bars/clubs/venues what they need to do to come into compliance BEFORE the June 1st law goes into effect.

Why is that a bad thing?

If you think that requiring a little soundproofing is asking too much, or that it's going to destroy nightlife, you're batshit crazy. What will the soundproofing cost? The revenue from one, maybe two, shows? Three at the most. That's a small price to pay for the greater good.

Any bar owner that would rather close up shop instead of install soundproofing is both a shitty business owner and a total douchecunt.

And as far as your "pig" comment goes-- I, too, have plenty of issues with the SPD. My issues, however, have to do with things like racial profiling and poor response times in low-income neighborhoods. You know, IMPORTANT stuff. Stuff far more relevant that your ability to go out and drink PBR while listening to some crappy garage band.

Just like Slog commenter misrule said a few posts back, this fucking city is full of "fucking spoiled, elitist, privileged, self-absorbed, self-obsessed, self-serving, inconsiderate, mentally-diapered children."

Posted by High Density | March 28, 2008 5:58 PM
16

You need to move to queen anne dude.

Posted by Alex | March 28, 2008 6:14 PM
17

ahh, the noise thing... I always thought it was funny, trying to take an accurate outside reading, but the busses and trains and car stereos and drunken conversations kept overpowering the music we were trying to measure. Literally asking people to be quiet so we could take an accurate reading of the music without their voices overpowering it.


it's City Living: those clubs are adding value to the condos going in around the Hill. If you're pissed, be pissed at the builders for skimping on the noise abatement, not that the nightclub you moved in next to is a... night club. Either the city has a vendetta or the neighbors are not participating in their neighborhood and being passive aggressive instead of approaching the venues on their own. Chop Suey are nice people and actually do care.


BTW, 57 decibels is just under "normal conversation" level.

Posted by ARN | March 28, 2008 7:06 PM
18

I grew up in the country and "city slickers" would move in next dor to farms and very quickly realize manure was not part of their quaint vision of the country. They would then use money/connections/litigation to close the farms down or regulate them to death.

It's funny/sad how cities are now suffering from the same suburban attackers. Don't move near the nightlife if you're not prepared to deal with crowding, noise, and drunk strangers wandering around at night.

There are plenty of comparably-priced condos in much more residential locales.

Posted by Dawgson | March 28, 2008 7:30 PM
19

"What will the soundproofing cost? The revenue from one, maybe two, shows? Three at the most"

Thats pretty funny..... obviously High Density doesn't have a fucking clue how clubs work and how much money it costs to run one.

Posted by lil' buddy | March 28, 2008 9:49 PM
20

"What will the soundproofing cost? The revenue from one, maybe two, shows? Three at the most"

Thats pretty funny..... obviously High density doesn't have a clue how much it costs to run a club... its not like running a bar. There are many expenses and not a lot of income (money from the door mostly goes to artists) They should soundproof their shit but its not that easy buddy.

Posted by el gringo | March 28, 2008 9:55 PM
21

Sad to say but Seattle is the new Bellevue......The Comet will probably be next on the City Council chopping block.

Posted by notonthehill | March 28, 2008 10:18 PM
22

Sad to say but Seattle is the new Bellevue......The Comet will probably be next on the City Council chopping block.

Posted by notonthehill | March 28, 2008 10:18 PM
23

One other thing,

High Desnity (@15, @13) -
ARN and Dawgson are right, perhaps you should consider moving somewhere else?

Posted by notonthehill | March 28, 2008 10:31 PM
24

@ High Density -


what does your opinion of X garage band's music have to do with it? and people drinking PBR? sounds like a bit of lifestyle profiling, pal. what, you hate everyone that likes cheap beer and bands that haven't reached their full potential yet? damn those hipster punks and their swoopy hair! i wish there was a way i could keep their fun from bothering me!!


i'm so sick of people trampling capitol hill. if you're gonna move in with us and develop the shit out of our neighborhood, then respect what was here before you! chop suey, neumos, the comet, and the whole fucking block that disappeared last week (cha cha through kincora) have been nightlife/entertainment/loud music havens for decades and gave color to this otherwise milktoast town.


if it wasn't for that street, the asswipes leveling our neighborhood and throwing up extremely ugly architecture wouldn't be able to do so because it wouldn't be worth anything. and speaking of money, High Density, sound proofing is actually very expensive to do. i know, because i'm a sound engineer. truly effective PROOFING requires that you build an airtight room within a room, cutting valuable space and attendance, and very expensive to do right. high density living requires you as a resident to accept the fucking neighborhood as it is. if you don't like it, LEAVE.

Posted by justino | March 29, 2008 3:27 AM
25

[i]Effective[/i] soundproofing is very, very expensive, particularly for the sort of bass that electronic/dance music can generate. Clubs that opened before a noise ordinance crackdown can't really be blamed for not budgeting for that sort of thing, and the don't typically have 20K+ sitting around for professional audio treatment (clubs are very large spaces). Also, doors and windows need to remain sealed for effective soundproofing, which is difficult to do without a "sonic airlock" at the doors--more expense and hassle for patrons.

Posted by Tiktok | March 29, 2008 8:15 AM
26

"high density living requires you as a resident to accept the fucking neighborhood as it is. if you don't like it, LEAVE."

Unfortunately you have to consider--the "neighborhood as it is" is defined by...the neighborhood. Irate residents can easily muster a lot of signatures to the effect that the "neighborhood as it is" is now quiet at night. So, perhaps hundreds of residents versus...three club owners? Who's the city going to give more weight to?

Clubs versus a mass of taxpayers never works out in the favor of the clubs.

Posted by Tiktok | March 29, 2008 8:19 AM
27

So where does this leave us?

We just lost The Crocodile not too long ago. If the mayor gets his way and cracks down on my beloved music haunts, what will happen to our local music scene?

I think these are just the opening volleys to another change in the Cap Hill neighborhood.

Posted by Grrr | March 29, 2008 10:33 AM
28

High Density,
I'm sorry but you are full of crap. It would be different if the city was holding building developers to the same standard that you want to hold clubowners to, but the city is not. So, we have a lot of new condos/townhomes going up that don't take noiseproofing into account (regardless of whether or not a club is there) and people pay through the nose for 'em. And when people pay through the nose for anything, they think that gives them a right to everything. There is nice low-income (lotta students) in the brick building across from where Kincora was and the city didn't step in for them. So people pay 450000 for a cracker box where you can hear a sneeze from the street with your windows closed. And what's it going to cost? Slightly less money on one or two condos (developers and condo developers really don't like the idea of making less money.)

I'm not saying Let it be Loud and clubs bear no responsibility, but there is a middle ground here and it has not been struck. And for the record, cops often have to waste their time showing up for calls that don't warrant their involvement. Typically, they don't know until they show up - and gasp, people lie to 911 operators (people were doing coke in the club, etc). When I lived in DC at one time I lived six blocks from the main drag of Adams Morgan. Quiet as churchmouse, but the heart of Adams Morgan was restaurants, music, bars, live music venues - a nice bit of density if you will, enjoyed by various ages and income levels and nationalities. However, 3am when everything shuts down it can look like a frat party gone wrong with masses of drunk people that would eat Belltown Billards as a snack and keep going in a wave extending to seattle center. Developers got a permit to build right on the main drag - high end large lofts marketed to families - and they came. And now x years later the folks in the high end lofts actually suggested that the businesses stop serving alcohol at a certain time on Friday nights. That bullshit should not happen here. Density can be a two way street - what's wrong with an area of clubs and such and its the slightly louder area and don't live there. Also for the record, in DC if my neighbors got rowdy or the local salvadoran combo was practicing too loud outside before their set inside, I got my ass out of bed and talked to them and then later I would call the cops. People don't know each other or care about their hood with terms like "density" I lived in a dense fuckin' place before and everyone knew who everyone was, and if you were a newbie, if you didn't seek out your neighbor, someone sought you out to see who you were. So get of the high density bullshit high horse and make an argument that spreads responsibility to everyone and not just "clubowners".

Posted by stone | March 29, 2008 10:56 AM
29

So what you're all REALLY saying is that since I want my right to quiet respected, I should shut the fuck up and move somewhere else? Yeah, that makes a whole freakin' LOT of sense.

If we were talking about an industrial neighborhood, I could see that argument working. But we're not. We're talking about a highly developed mixed use neighborhood full of people who are all choosing to live here for different reasons.

As a culture, Americans don't really understand high-density living (or how to do it correctly), but it is something that we should be encouraging and developing.

I live in my high density neighborhood because of its proximity to my school, my work, and the places I like to go to. I live in my high density neighborhood because I can not only live without a car, but I can live without the BUS for all intents and purposes. I live in my high density neighborhood because I can walk to the store, to a coffee shop, to breakfast lunch or dinner, to a movie theatre, to a theatre theatre, or even to *gasp* a NIGHTCLUB.

If you want to talk about things that "add value" to a neighborhood, it's things like accessibility, walk-ability, the stores, restaurants, museums, parks, and community cohesiveness and organizing. Nightclubs and concerts venues do not RAISE the value of homes-- they come along with things like drunks outside at 2:30 am and vomit covered sidewalks and litter. (There are few blocks dirtier on a Sunday morning than the blocks immediately surrounding Neumo's.)

The property values on Capitol Hill are rising DESPITE and not BECAUSE OF the nightclubs.

Do I want to see all of the clubs go away? Hell no. Do I want to see Capitol Hill continue to grow and develop and evolve? Kinda. I mean, I've lived in this neighborhood for going on twelve years now and I've witnessed a LOT of change. Some good, some bad, but the fact of the matter is, we started this process of super-gentrification a long time ago when we decided that Capitol Hill was the hip place to live/work/play. That's not going to change, it's out of our hands now.

(On a side note, I'm surprised that it took as long as it did. As recently as 2005, condos could be had on the Hill for as little as $140,000. For a popular neighborhood, so close to downtown, in a major city-- that's freakin' CRAZY.)

While it makes me sad to see overpriced condo after overpriced condo go up, and for people to be priced out of the Hill, the environmentalist in me is happy to see single family housing get replaced by multi-family housing and green construction.

Despite arguments to the contract, the condo developers ARE installing soundproofing in the new-construction condos. They receive adequate soundproofing to block out all normal, anticipated noise coming from INSIDE of the units (blocking unit to unit noise) and a normal level of outside noise.

Why is it the condo owner's job to ensure that they live in super soundproofed fortresses so that the club owners can be as loud as they damn well please? It is the job of the NOISE MAKER to ensure that their noise doesn't disturb other people, not vice versa. (That responsibility is based not only in common sense but in the LAW.)

By that logic, it's the responsibility of the house in the 'hood that keeps getting shot the fuck up to install bulletproof glass and not the responsibility of the fucking kids doing the drive-by to STOP SHOOTING.

If club owners did not have the foresight to soundproof their clubs and to prepare for the growth and evolution of Capitol Hill, then that was poor planning on their part. And even the argument of $20k being the cost of soundproofing? The last time I checked, a PBR does NOT cost anywhere near $4.00. With a mark-up like that, it really would only take the revenue from a couple of shows to upgrade the soundproofing.

Posted by High Density | March 29, 2008 11:54 AM
30

The reason people move to Capitol Hill is because of the High Density that it provides. Great restaurants, coffee shops, bars, and live music venues. This is in fact why a lot of people move specifically to Seattle.

We're not talking about chump change here that is needed to soundproof these businesses. Chop Suey got a quote of 60K to soundproof the building. Let's not forget that we're required to have sprinkler systems too. That costs roughly 40K just to plug into the city, let alone another 40K for the actual system.

This is huge $. This has all come up very recently and nobody could have expected this.

We have met with EVERY organization to try and find out why this is all happening and what we can do to remedy the situation. We have spent countless hours trying to find a solution. The music community is very organized on this matter.

We will continue to do what we can to bring live entertainment to Capitol Hill.

I would also like to note that I didn't say we wouldn't turn it down. We have a good relationship with the city officials and we would never put that in jeopardy. We will get it figured out.

High Density, you have NO idea how much it costs to run a club and shouldn't even bother speaking on that part.

Enjoy y'alls day.

Posted by Steven Severin | March 29, 2008 12:39 PM
31

Once again High Density- It would not take the revenue from a couple shows to pay for soundproofing!! Yes bars make money from marking up drinks, but venues differ from bars in that they have many more expences than a regular bar has. Often the cost of putting on the show, promoting it, paying the artist etc., almost ofsets the profits made at the bar. Its a tough business and guys like steven and the chopsuey owner aren't being assholes here.

Posted by el gringo | March 29, 2008 12:53 PM
32

I agree...... High Density, You have no idea of the cost associated with running a club and to say to construct buildings to future regulatory standards is ridiculous, especially 15 years out. Hence grandfather clauses with old housing and buildings. It is almost like saying every time a new housing regulation is passed you have to update your house/condo with the new standard. They change pretty often FYI......

The neighborhood is experiencing growing pains and regulation needs to be enacted mindfully of the existing businesses as well as residents. But in the end its important to be aware of the neighborhood your moving into.

Posted by Michael Yuasa | March 29, 2008 1:26 PM
33

It's been my experience that the clueless losers (like the one up there that moved to the Hill for every reason except nightclubs and their driveby shootings, and thinks that venue owners are swimming in cash) really are a tiny minority, but can cause real problems. Ask the Redwood or The High Dive.

Posted by ARN | March 29, 2008 1:38 PM
34

High Density -

the burdens you put on clubs are unreasonable and impossible to meet. and you have no idea what you are talking about. i should also point out that if you don't like the noise from a club, you don't really have to move that far away to get quiet. just one block off of any main drag will make a big difference. capitol hill is big. what's wrong with leaving clubs a FEW BLOCKS to be a bit noisy in? afterall, that's all we're left with now.

Posted by justino | March 29, 2008 1:43 PM
35

"High Density" just got the douchbag of the year award!

congratulations, PIG

Posted by bobcat | March 29, 2008 2:45 PM
36

"High Density" just got awarded the "Douchbag of the Year" award!

way to go, PIGGY PIGGY PIGGY

Posted by bobcat | March 29, 2008 2:46 PM
37

HD, I would never say your right to quiet should not be respected. I'm saying middle ground - and please, new yorkers as a people and culture know density very well - I'm just saying don't put the most expensive stuff on top of or across from RPlace and get Rplace to have better sound stuff so the windows don't shake with bass. But a developer friend has stated that a lot of the new construction is shoddy and sometimes the bare minimum for sound isn't done. I don't understand HD why you think the burden shouldn't be shared. Just wait till the sidewalk cafe licenses come up for restaurants.

Posted by stone | March 29, 2008 5:18 PM
38

People move to Pike/Pine because of the cool clubs. That is why a project like Trace Lofts gets built. Problem is that when people move in they realize what they knew along, that cool clubs are, well...LOUD. Then they become acivists and want to close them down. The developers know this and want to close down the clubs also so that the new neighborhood that was originally created because of the clubs, but later becomes anti club because of noise, will be totally residential. The developers no longer need the clubs that started the neighborhood, they need buyers and renters for their units. What is unfair is that the clubs were there first and they should be able to stay because of precident.

Posted by jefff | March 29, 2008 7:06 PM
39

This was a long time coming. The neighborhood is officially over. And let me welcome the new condo dwellers to our newly minted environment. thanks for fucking up the neighborhood... I think I'm going to move now.

Posted by apttitle | March 30, 2008 10:36 AM
40

I'm sorry Mr. High Density snooty attitude, but live music is "important stuff" to our community. I would argue that music and arts are important to society in general and we should be helping foster them, rather than stifle them. And while you may be a fan of a big intrusive and expensive government over-regulating businesses, consider the idea that some of us are not. Thanks to people like you, the city is hiring an $80,000+ a year club czar with our tax dollars. Thanks to people like you our cops are getting pulled away from street beats and crime enforcement to do walk-throughs through rock clubs because of a single complaint. And thanks to people like you we are getting increased regulation, rules and laws that all add up to a bigger and more expensive government, leading to higher taxes.

There are absolutely tons of areas to live in this city that are quieter than Pike/Pine, Belltown and Pioneer Square, yet for some reason there are always a few self-centered jerks that move into these areas with an active nightlife and try to silence them. The clubs and bars were there before you, you should have considered there existence before moving in. Sure, you can still whine about it, but you really should not expect any sympathy.

In your mind the 5,000-10,000 or so people filling the bars and clubs in the Pike/Pine area on a Friday night should just go away because you bought a condo there. And all your neighbors that moved there specifically to be close to those clubs and bars should fuck off, because your rights trump there's, right? You self-centered asshole. Consider for a moment thinking about someone else besides yourself.

Posted by dan10things | March 30, 2008 2:01 PM
41

High Density is the horn-rimmed glasses of douches

Posted by lar | March 30, 2008 2:10 PM
42

Chop Suey's owner has decided to downgrade the sound system by replacing their 18inch sub-woofers with 10inch subs...thanks SPD

Posted by freelywheely | March 30, 2008 10:44 PM
43

Chop Suey's owner has decided to downgrade the club's sound system from its 18in sub-woolfers to 10inch subs...thnx to the lone neighbor on 14th who constantly calls SPD.

Posted by wheely | March 30, 2008 10:54 PM
44

Chop Suey's owner has decided to downgrade the club's sound system from its 18inch sub-woolfers to 10inch subs...RIP live music from the Chop & thank you to the lone neighbor on 14th who always called the SPD.

Posted by wheely | March 30, 2008 11:06 PM
45

Wow. Can't say I care enough about this argument to read the whole damn thread, but I live six or seven blocks from Chop Suey and have to hear their music on occassion. Six or seven blocks!

Sorry. Maybe I'm an old fart. But if you don't like me calling the cops, lobby to get the noise ordinance changed. Bitching on the web doesn't really help.

Oh, and #24, it's spelled "milquetoast," jackass.

Posted by Dan | March 30, 2008 11:19 PM
46

@45: Could you tell me if "overreact" had a hyphen or not?

As in the sentence "I hate it when people overreact to noises that aren't that loud because they have nothing better to do with their lives than meddle, bitch, and moan."

Thanks. I also appreciate any other grammar suggestions you might have.

Posted by Dawgson | March 31, 2008 10:48 AM
47

there has to be a happy medium.

i live on pike street, directly across from the war room and the maharaja. the war room is INSANELY loud. i've had pictures fall off my walls from the thumping. people bump music from their cars in the BMW parking lot until 4 in the morning, and we're talking on a TUESDAY night.

however, it was my choice. i wanted cheap rent, found a tiny studio, and knew that i was moving directly into the bar/nightlife scene.

which is why i have never called the cops. i just invested in a good pair of ear plugs, and i pray each morning that i wake up to my alarm.

but still, i feel businesses need to be somewhat respectful. even if attempts are made (like the signs outside The Rosebud and Cha Cha to keep it down because of neighbors), that at least shows somewhat that they are making an effort. a compromise (clubs NOT shutting down, but adjusting volumes to accommodate the people living around them), doesn't seem to be a huge deal.

Posted by pike st. dweller | March 31, 2008 2:25 PM
48

there has to be a happy medium.

i live on pike street, directly across from the war room and the maharaja. the war room is INSANELY loud. i've had pictures fall off my walls from the thumping. people bump music from their cars in the BMW parking lot until 4 in the morning, and we're talking on a TUESDAY night.

however, it was my choice. i wanted cheap rent, found a tiny studio, and knew that i was moving directly into the bar/nightlife scene.

which is why i have never called the cops. i just invested in a good pair of ear plugs, and i pray each morning that i wake up to my alarm.

but still, i feel businesses need to be somewhat respectful. even if attempts are made (like the signs outside The Rosebud and Cha Cha to keep it down because of neighbors), that at least shows somewhat that they are making an effort. a compromise (clubs NOT shutting down, but adjusting volumes to accommodate the people living around them), doesn't seem to be a huge deal.

Posted by pike street dweller | March 31, 2008 2:28 PM
49

Dan has a point.. has anyone on this thread lobbied against, written to city officails or attended any public meetings against this nightclub ordinance that places severe restrictions on nightclubs? Maybe we should get on that instead of wasting our time on this bullshit blog.

Posted by hmmm | April 1, 2008 4:26 AM

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