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Wednesday, April 9, 2008

Tonight in Music: Meat Beat Manifesto, Team Gina, and Gabriel Mintz

posted by on April 9 at 10:25 AM

Gabriel Mintz, the Autumn Film, Velvet Drive, Venus Verse
(Comet) Singer songwriter Gabriel Mintz has one of the finest voices in Seattle. He gets so excited and jittery sometimes, he can hardly speak. Then he sings, and a voice you had no idea he contained surrounds you. His higher register is gravelly and worn. Closer to the mic, his lower register becomes unashamed of its beauty. Playing the guitar sedates Mintz. Lyrics are about his previous New York drug days and Greyhound bus individuations. Mintz drifted. He climbed a support cable up the Brooklyn Bridge to steal a flag. He had a schizoid roommate in a psych ward who was afraid of an octopus under his bed. Mintz scrounged for hits, food, and West Village shelter. From these experiences, he pulls the darker parts of his sound. TRENT MOORMAN

teamgina1.jpg
Team Gina photo by Gregory Perez

Mad Rad, Team Gina, DJ Gameboy
(Chop Suey) Team Gina seem like something you’ve seen before. Lesbians, rapping over electro beats, wearing cute clothes, and synchronizing their dance moves? It’s familiar, but the Ginas go above and beyond—the rhymes, delivered with an overdose of sass, are actually funny! For example, from “Deez (Kids Are) Nuts”: “Misogyny is cool/especially in Catholic school/the principal will always look the other way/because my mom is the head of the PTA.” Hopefully they’ll play their new track, “Products of the ’80s.” It had ‘em rolling in the aisles at Leslie & the LYs a few weeks back because it’s what the Ginas do best—take something you think you’ve heard enough of and make it sound new, fresh, and hi-larious. ARI SPOOL
Meat Beat Manifesto, Raz Mesinai
(Neumo’s) Meat Beat Manifesto, a UK crew led by Jack Dangers, have done it all. Hiphop, triphop, rap, disco, funk, hard techno, minimal techno, lyrical techno, dub, industrial—you name it, they’ve played it. MBM’s last release, an EP called Guns N Lovers, turned to dubstep and produced four perfectly dark, terrifically deep, and sweetly sad cuts. Despite MBM’s long life (around since 1987) and diversity, their music never sounds exhausted or diluted. Listen to the smooth RUOK? (2002) or the jazzy Off-Centre EP (2005)—each track is fresh, wide awake, and searching for the perfect beat. MBM are also known for producing incredibly involved live shows: visuals, costumes, dancers, the whole works. CHARLES MUDEDE

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