From Wikipedia:

[I]t was only in the first decades of the 20th century that the most common current structure became standard: the so-called AAB pattern, consisting of a line sung over the four first bars, its repetition over the next four, and then a longer concluding line over the last bars.
I have always wondered about the AAB pattern structure of traditional blues verse:


The peaches I'm loving
Don't grow on no trees
The peaches I'm loving
Don't grow on no trees
Lord, it's somewhere baby
Just above yo' knees

What is the meaning of this structure? Where did it come from? Why is it so powerfully felt? I now more and more believe that the answer is to be found in the foundation of this...
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The universe is in essence, or has its ground in, symmetry and the breaking of that symmetry. This is how the universe began, a snap in the symmetry of photons; and this beginning expresses itself in all that participates in the universe—a face, a leaf, a DNA molecule. It's not just duplication but the disruption of that duplication, and much of the new thinking in particle physics sees this as the tendency rather than as a sheer anomaly. Symmetry desires to be broken. The AAB structure is this same desire: repetition (mirror, reflection, symmetry) and a resolution that disrupts that repetition.


My name is Piggly Wiggly, I got groceries on my shelf.
My name is Piggly Wiggly, I got groceries on my shelf.
Now that I got you baby, I don't want nobody else.